Edding 850: A Pen Unlike All the Others

Writing on the TIME Magazine article with an Edding 850

When the Berlin Wall came down in November 1989, all East Germans could claim 100DM, the equivalent of about $100 in US dollars today, from the government of West Germany, to be spent at their leisure. This Begrüßungsgeld or “welcome money,” was a long-standing practice that was now accessible to all.

TIME Magazine reported on what 10 people did with their money, including an East Berliner named Jens Müller, aka graffiti artist Tasso, who spent 10 of his 100 DM on an Edding 850 Permanent Marker.

“For me it was the first time I had seen graffiti tags, on every corner in every place,” he says, of driving with friends around Kreuzberg in West Berlin as a 23-year-old. “I was wondering, ‘How have they done this?’ And then I see it must be a pen, a marker, and so I said, ‘I want to have this marker.’” He found one in a Karstadt department store that cost 10 of his 100 DM. “That was a lot. My friends thought I was crazy.” He worked in construction following reunification, eventually becoming a freelance artist. Today his tag is recognized around the world. He has visited 32 different countries to make, exhibit and promote his work.

TIME Magazine quoting Jens Müller, aka Tasso.

After a long time only being available through grey market importers, Edding pens and markers are now finally available in the US & Canada, from the permanent markers to the drawing, coloring and decorating pens and markers. Which one is your favorite?

November 16: Understanding Contemporary Oil Painting Materials

Since its founding, Gamblin Artists Colors has handcrafted luscious oil colors and contemporary mediums true to the working properties of traditional materials, yet safer and more permanent. Gamblin’s dedication to today’s oil painters extends beyond offering the finest possible materials – they believe in sharing their knowledge so painters can choose those materials that best support their own artistic visions.

Understanding Contemporary Oil Painting Materials, a 90 minute Lecture Demonstration will cover the following:

  • Color Theory – 2-dimensional vs 3-dimensional Color Space
  • Color Mixing – Navigating Color Space: Gamblin’s practical approach to color mixing
  • Artist’s Oil Colors – Gamblin’s approach to color making
  • Mineral vs Modern Pigments – How to create a personalized palette of colors
  • Indirect vs Direct Techniques – Historical application of opaque and transparent colors
  • FastMatte Alkyd Oil Colors – Benefits and uses of fast-drying, matte oil colors
  • 1980 Oil Colors – True Color. Real Value.
  • Painting Mediums – Choosing the right medium, including working properties and drying rates
  • Building Permanent Paintings – Understanding Fat Over Lean
  • Supports, Sizing and Grounds – How they affect color and permanence
  • Gamvar Picture Varnish – Understanding contemporary varnishes and controlling surface quality
  • Studio Safety – Create without compromise in a safe studio

Gamblin Artist Colors will provide each attendee with a FREE sample bag including products and literature.

About the Presenter

Timothy Robert Smith is a Los Angeles based oil painter and muralist, using observational techniques to portray a multi-dimensional perspective of the universe. Since recently graduating from Laguna College of Art and Design with an MFA in studio art, he has had two exhibitions at Copro Gallery in Bergamot Station. He currently teaches at CSU Los Angeles, where he received his BFA degree. Timothy’s artwork can be viewed at www.timothyrobertsmith.com.

Gamblin Conservation Colors

Restoration of van Gogh’s Bedroom in Arles. Photo courtesy of the Van Gogh Museum.

At Raw Materials Art Supplies, it is important to us to carry products from the companies who are out there doing good things for artists and art. The work that Gamblin Artists Colors does with their Gamblin Conservation Colors is a good example of that.

In the world of art conservation today, there are three important considerations regarding the materials used on artwork. First, the materials used for this work should be stable – meaning that the materials should not change over time. Second, the materials should be reversible and able to be removed without damaging the original artwork. And third, the binder of the material should visually saturate the pigment in a similar manner as linseed oil.

In the mid-90’s, Robert Gamblin collaborated with a group of conservators to improve upon these considerations. Gamblin Conservation Colors were born from this collaboration. They include 50 lightfast colors – made with pigments found in the Gamblin Artist’s Grade and 1980 oils and bound in a contemporary resin binder, which makes the restorations stable and reversible.

Conservation Colors are not sold to artists for a couple reasons. First, they lack the texture and mark-making possibilities of oils. Second, they demand a stronger solvent than artists have (or are willing to work around) in their studios.

Gamblin Conservation colors is truly a labor of love in support of conservators around the world. When you purchase Gamblin materials, you are also supporting the field of conservation and helping to protect our visual history. We are very grateful for your support.

November 14: Exploring Daniel Smith Watercolors

Daniel Smith Watercolors

Join us for a fun and interesting conversation with Kim Del Valle, Sales Representative for DANIEL SMITH Manufacturing. Have questions about our Primatek colors? Wonder where the color Serpentine comes from? How does the color Moonglow get its name or how does DANIEL SMITH tests pigments for lightfastness? What’s granulation? This is a great opportunity to learn more in a conversational and relaxed atmosphere.

The presentation will start off with the history of DANIEL SMITH Manufacturing and the many aspects of developing DANIEL SMITH products. You will see firsthand lab paint outs, minerals used to manufacture colors in the PrimaTek line and more. The finale…the exciting opportunity to sample a selection of our colors and put paint to paper!!!

  • History of Daniel Smith
  • How we make our paint.
  • See actual lab paint outs and touch actual minerals used in our Prima-tek line.
  • Discuss the color chart and the great information it contains.
  • Put paint to paper..Allow artists the fun experience to sample many of our colors on a sheet watercolor paper

Introducing Wrapped Wood Panels by Lucius Hudson, Inc.

PVA-sized linen wrapped on a cradled wood panel by Lucius Hudson, Inc.

Lucius Hudson, Inc. has been making fine art stretcher bars and wood panels for artists since 1966. Their dedication to detail and the quality of their products is legendary, and you may have heard of some of their clients. (Does Takashi Murakami ring a bell?)

When they approached us to be the first-ever retailer for their products, how could we not want to put these beautiful surfaces into the hands of our amazing customers? We are excited to start with a selection of their linen-wrapped wood panels in two popular sizes.

These aren’t your every-day cradled wood panels: these are made using torsion box construction: a matrix of 4″ × 4″ inch boxes glued between two plywood sheets produces greater strength and stability over traditional cradled wood panel designs. For acid and moisture protection all panels are sealed with shellac. Each panel has a full cleat, allowing it to be hung from any side. Panels that are wrapped in canvas or linen are cut with notches in the corners so the fold doesn’t protrude.

Back side of the panel, showing the cleat edge (and a hint of the notch for the fold).

Let’s talk a little more about that notch, because this is one of those design details that just demonstrates the commitment to quality that Lucius Hudson, Inc. has. When you stretch a canvas (either on stretcher bars or over a panel like these), you have probably noticed the bulges on the corner where the canvas has to be folded. (Or, worse, had a canvas eventually fall apart because someone had the bright idea to cut the overlapping fabric.) They’ve solved that problem by engineering the panel with small notches, so the fold naturally tucks in and no longer causes that unsightly bulge.

So dig deep into your wallet and prepare to pay highly-inflated prices for these highly-engineered surfaces, right? Wrong. Lucius Hudson really wants to get these into the hands of artists, so they’ve worked with us to offer special pricing on a curated selection of sizes and varieties. We have started with a couple of sizes of panels wrapped with PVA-sized linen, and we would love to hear from artists what other varieties they would like to see us have on hand.

(And they don’t just make wrapped wood panels, stay tuned for more exciting products in the future!)

Happy Inktober! Meet the New Piñata Alcohol Ink Colors

New Piñata Alcohol Ink Colors: Teal, Blue-Violet, Coral, Pink, and Golden Yellow

5 NEW reasons to love Piñata Color: Golden Yellow, Pink, Coral, Blue-Violet, and Teal! Piñata Colors are fast-drying, super vibrant alcohol inks for non-porous surfaces like glass, metal, plastic, ceramic, YUPO®, leather, polymer clay and resin. Indelible and impervious to water, Piñata Colors clean up and re-wet with alcohol, allowing for unique effects and techniques not easily achieved with water-based inks.

New Piñata Alcohol Ink Colors: Teal, Blue-Violet, Coral, Pink, and Golden Yellow

WHY 5 NEW COLORS? Some colors are more challenging to mix from scratch than others. This is especially true of complex colors like teal and coral. Alcohol ink artists have been asking for these colors, and Jacquard is proud to announce their release.

NEW PIÑATA EXCITER: Jacquard is also proud to introduce the NEW Piñata Overtones Exciter Pack! This collection of 9 alcohol inks includes the 5 NEW colors + Blanco Blanco, Copper, Brass, & Pearl. The Piñata Overtones Exciter Pack makes a superb companion to the original Piñata Exciter Pack, offering a complex palette to compliment the more elementary colors in the original set.

Watch below as artist Annie Morcos (@AnniesArtStudio) creates a resin petri project featuring the new Piñata Colors!

InkTober 2019 Official Prompt List

InkTober 2019 Official Prompt List

🕷️ Ready for InkTober? Above is the InkTober 2019 prompt list, in case you wanted to join in the inky fun. 🕸️

InkTober rules:

1) Make a drawing in ink (you can do a pencil under-drawing if you want). 

2) Post it 

3) Hashtag it with #inktober and #inktober2019 

4) Repeat 

Them’s the rules. We urge you to tag us during the month of October so we can help you to show off your inky creations.

Warm Welcome from the Fashion District BID

Trending With: Raw Materials Art Supplies video, courtesy of LA Fashion District BID

Our friends at the Fashion District Business Improvement District (FDBID) @lafashiondistrict shot this fun video to welcome us and to introduce us to the neighborhood! 🧡

Thank you Miranda and the entire marketing team at the FDBID, you guys rock! 😘

Farewell, Swain’s and C2F!

Karl Wiest, owner of Swain’s HQ Art Supplies

It has been a rough start to the fall in the art materials industry. The Los Angeles area lost an institution with the closing of Swain’s HQ Art Supplies, which has been supporting artists and selling art supplies in Glendale for seventy years, and we are very sad to see them go.

Read Karl’s message to customers. Thank you Karl for mentioning us and the other independent retailers still fighting on in Southern California.

The imminent closure of C2F, one of the few distributors of art materials was also announced. They were the primary source for a few of our favorite brands (such as M. Graham, Bee Paper, Pentalic, and Cheep!), but it looks like most of those will find new homes so we plan to continue stocking them as long as we’re able!

We live in interesting times for retailers and the art materials industry. Sometimes we feel like we’re mice scampering beneath the feet of giants with names like Amazon, Blick Art Materials, and Artist & Craftsman Supply, and it’s tough to lose friends and allies like C2F and Swain’s.

We, and our employees, thank all of you who have stuck with us, are just discovering, us, and hope to feed your artistic endeavors for years to come.