David Arquette Teaches Bob Ross Technique @ Raw Materials to benefit Inner-City Arts

We’ve been lucky enough to get some press on the Bob Ross Painting Class that actor David Arquette taught at Raw Materials (thanks to Emmy-winning reporter Nic Cha Kim at Spectrum News!) but we felt it was important for you to know, as mentioned in the news story, that the proceeds from the class went to support one of the nation’s most effective arts education providers, Inner-City Arts. Not familiar with the organization? Check out this video:

Inner-City Arts inspires the next generation of creators and makers.

We recently visited Inner-City Arts‘ beautiful, award-winning campus in Downtown Los Angeles, and came away so inspired. We are even more committed to continue supporting them and invite you to join us in advocating for arts education for our communities.

Introducing an Oil Painting Master Class with Salomón Huerta

Artist/Teacher Salomón Huerta with a few of his paintings.

You asked, we did it. We scheduled a calendar full of classes and workshops in our new space. Our opening month classes and workshops have been leading up to the introduction of Master Class at Raw Materials, where prominent artists teach intensive workshops that go beyond art school. Master Class will provide intensive interaction with professional artists working in a variety of media and will draw from a broad spectrum of cultural viewpoints. Students interact closely with working artists and can gain insight into how artists approach the making of art and respond to the work of others. Teaching groups are deliberately small, intense, and personalized.

Our first class in this series is an Oil Painting Master Class taught by internationally acclaimed painter Salomón Huerta on Saturday, September 7. This 120-minute class is for artists of all levels and experiences. Students bring their projects and come prepared to work with Salomón Huerta on executing their artistic vision. This class is great for students applying to art school, artists seeking portfolios guidance, and/or gallery representation. Class size is limited to 15 students. 

Internationally-acclaimed Los Angeles-based painter Salomón Huerta was born in Tijuana, raised in East L.A. and attended the Art Center College of Design on a full scholarship, where he graduated with highest honors. Huerta also holds a Master of Fine Art from UCLA and is best known for his series of paintings depicting anonymous subjects with their backs to the viewer, facades of color-saturated, suburban homes, and larger than life-sized, masked Lucha Libre wrestlers. Huerta’s paintings have been collected and exhibited internationally, including at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Armand Hammer Museum of Art, Gagosian Gallery London, Worcester Museum of Art, The Smithsonian Institute, and at the Whitney Biennal. Huerta is represented by Louise Alexander Gallery.

About a year ago, Salomón Huerta was nice enough to shoot this short video about his favorite art supply store and the products he uses. Check it out:

Is David Arquette the new Bob Ross?

LA Weekly asks if David Arquette is the new Bob Ross
Photo by Mia Fesmire

In their Best of LA Arts Issue, The LA Weekly asked if David Arquette is the new Bob Ross, and you answered with a resounding yes.

David Arquette teaching Bob Ross Painting Class at Raw Materials Art Supplies
August 24, 2019 – Photo by Mia Fesmire

On August 24th, Raw Materials Art Supplies was lucky to have Certified Ross Instructor David Arquette teach a Bob Ross Painting Class—our very first class in our new location! To no one’s surprise, the class sold out quickly. 

Bob Ross Painting Class at Raw Materials Art Supplies taught by David Arquette
Photo by Mia Fesmire

In just under two hours, students eager to start a painting hobby learned how to paint an outdoor landscape. Based upon the PBS “Joy of Painting” series with Bob Ross, these artists of various abilities and experience painted and learned Bob Ross’ painting techniques, thanks to David Arquette’s guidance and friendly style.

David Arquette teaches The Joy of Painting
Photo by Mia Fesmire

If you missed out and couldn’t get a seat to the class, don’t fret. David said he had so much fun he’d like to do it again.

David Arquette in a Bob Ross wig.
Bob Ross Painting Class students at Raw Materials Art Supplies
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Students in the Bob Ross painting class learn to paint landscapes.
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Students in the Bob Ross painting class learn to paint landscapes.
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Students in the Bob Ross painting class learn to paint landscapes.
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Students in the Bob Ross painting class learn to paint landscapes.
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Students in the Bob Ross painting class learn to paint landscapes.
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Big smiles and good times with proud teacher David Arquette and his students
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Big smiles and good times with proud teacher David Arquette and his students
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Bob Ross Painting Class students
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Big smiles with proud teacher David Arquette and his student with a completed painting
Photo by Mia Fesmire
Photographer Mia Fesmire poses with Bob Ross cardboard stand-up

In the meantime, all Bob Ross paints, sets, brushes, and accessories are ON SALE at 20% OFF during our Back To Whatever Sale. Come get yours. 

Realistic Watercolor Painting w/Kelly Eddington

What do you love to paint the most? You’ll never know until you explore a wide variety of subject matter. This online workshop presents a sampler of popular watercolor subjects: landscapes, still life, and portraits. Kelly Eddington will show you how watercolor’s unique properties can do the heavy lifting in each painting. Watch watercolor create a serene blue sky, a soft shadow defining a cheekbone, and reflected light on a shiny surface—all in seconds. Watercolor is challenging and can take decades to master, but this medium’s special quirks are so seductive you might find yourself under its spell for the rest of your life.

The Mind of Watercolor w/Steve Mitchell

Watercolor can be one of the simplest mediums to use, but it does seem to have a mind of its own at times, giving it the reputation of being fussy and unforgiving to work with. In this four part workshop Steve Mitchell gets into the mind of watercolor and see what makes it tick. Success with watercolor depends greatly on discovering and anticipating how it reacts in real painting situations.

These are Drying Times

Check out this video where Richard and Darin of R&F Handmade Paints talk about things that affect the drying rates of R&F Pigment Sticks. Probably one of the most frequently asked questions we get about Pigment Sticks is, how long they take to dry compared to oil paint out of a tube. Don’t forget that R&F Pigment Sticks are ON SALE at 15% OFF during our MOVING SALE.

OPEN Slow-Drying Acrylics Landscape Set

Just in time for summer, Golden Artist Colors’ OPEN Slow-Drying Acrylics Landscape Set is ON SALE at 30% OFF! Designed for the traditional painter looking for an alternative to oil paints, plein air painters, and/or acrylic painters whose palettes need to remain wet far longer than other acrylics. Blend, soften and shade with traditional painting techniques, reduce skinning on the palette during long painting sessions, both in studio and outdoors. The Golden OPEN Slow Drying Acrylics Landscape Set includes seven (7) 22ml tubes: cadmium yellow primrose, yellow ochre, alizarin crimson hue, cadmium red light, ultramarine blue, manganese blue hue, and sap green hue. Also includes one 59ml tube of titanium white and one 30ml bottle of OPEN Thinner.

The Importance of Blue: Artist Pablo Ruben

Daniel Smith presents watercolor artist Pablo Ruben and “The Importance of Blue”

Undoubtedly blue is the essential color in my palette and I have up to six spaces reserved in my usual work zone for them. My works are characterized by cold and grayish ranges, so the blues are completely irreplaceable. The blues that I use the most are: Indigo, Indanthrone Blue, Ultramarine Blue, Cerulean Blue Chromium, Lavender, and Cobalt Teal Blue.

Diagram of the colors used for “Fuente de Castellar”

When mixed with different earth tones (Burnt SiennaBurnt UmberSepia, etc.) I get infinite ranges of grays for all types of planes (background, middle ground and foreground). Mixed with a single yellow, I get a great variety of greens, as I do not usually have greens on my palette.

Pablo Ruben’s DANIEL SMITH Watercolor mixes for making grays

In the reference work “Fuente de Castellar” (Castellar Fountain) the blue is the essential protagonist of the work since the source is the main element of the work. To achieve the main gradient, three blues interlaced and fused with the proper density are necessary to produce the depth effect.

“Fuente de Castellar” by Pablo Rubén

Pablo Rubén has been painting since he was a child, and the last 18 years working as a professional artist. President of the International Watercolor Society of Spain, he has joined in many of the most important watercolor Biennials all around the World: China, Korea, Thailand, India, Mexico, Canada, Belgium, Italy and has been awarded in International competitions such as American Watercolor Society, San Diego Watercolor Society, Slovenia International Watercolor Society.  He is a passionate artist of “Plein Air” work and has more than 400 awards in this kind of contests in Spain and France. As a watercolor instructor he has given workshops in Spain, Portugal, France, Italy, Russia, Canada, USA, Brazil, and Mexico; being very appreciated as an art teacher. An avid traveler, urban scapes and all sorts of water reflections are the main subjects in his work, playing with aerial points of view to make original compositions. 

Pablo Rubén paintings demonstrating the Importance of Blue

“Pilar de la Horadada” by Pablo Rubén
“Alovera” by Pablo Rubén
“Membrilla” by Pablo Rubén
“Blue Bridge” by Pablo Rubén

Experience Green with Gamblin Artist’s Oil Colors

Douglas FryerHighway Farm (top), Patch of Sunlight (bottom left), Edge of an English Village (bottom right). http://douglasfryer.blogspot.com/

An Abundance of Green
At risk of stating the obvious, there is a lot of green in the world.

This is true not only in nature, but in science. Residing in the middle of the spectrum of visible light, the human eye most readily sees green more than any other color. With great abundance, comes great variety. Our task as painters to navigate this broad color family comes with many challenges and possibilities – as greens vary drastically in regards to temperature and intensity.

The color green can put our eyes (and minds) at rest. It is the world-wide color of environmental consciousness. Green is a primary of light (additive color-mixing), but not of pigments (subtractive color-mixing).

Navigating Green
We’ve heard from painters over the years that green is a challenging color family to mix within. It is. Not because we don’t have greens readily available from tubes, but because there is just so much darn green to navigate. We are so closely tied to nature, it can be a challenge to our sensibilities to incorporate greens of great intensity into our color palettes and paintings.

Let’s dive in and explore where the greens in the Gamblin palette fit into Color Space:

Mineral Greens
Cadmium Chartreuse (PY35, PG36)  OPAQUE
Cadmium Green (PY35, PG18)  OPAQUE
Olive Green (PBr7, PY75, PB29) SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Terre Verte (PY43, PG18, PBk9) TRANSPARENT
Chromium Oxide Green (PG17)  OPAQUE
Cobalt Green (PG19)  SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Viridian (PG18)  TRANSPARENT
Modern Greens
Green Gold (PY129) TRANSPARENT
Sap Green (PB15:2, PY83) TRANSPARENT
Permanent Green Light (PY74, PG7) SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Phthalo Emerald (PG36) TRANSPARENT
Emerald Green (PG36, PW6, PY74)  SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Phthalo Green (PG7) TRANSPARENT
Radiant Green (PG36, PY3, PW6) OPAQUE
Phthalo Turquoise (PB15:2, PG7) TRANSPARENT

Note that we’ve included Cadmium Chartreuse and Phthalo Turquoise in this mapping, as they sit on the edge of green and yellow, and green and blue, respectively.

Mineral Greens and the Phthalo Boost
Mineral green pigments, such as Viridian, Cobalt Green and Chromium Green Oxide beautifully grey down in their tints and mixtures making them useful when depicting muted greens of the natural world.

To fully capture the diversity of this hue family, greens with greater chroma may be necessary. Permanent Green Light and Emerald Green are ready to go for this. The cool, blue-leaning Phthalo Green and the warmer Phthalo Emerald are both deep from the tube, yet beautifully vibrant in their transparency and tints. You don’t have to use phthalo pigments long before appreciating their high tinting-strength. Another key characteristic of this family of these modern organic pigments is their intensity in their tints and mixtures. Thus, Phthalo Green and Phthalo Emerald are incredibly useful in boosting the chroma of muted greens and pushing the envelope on incorporating “unworldly” greens into our painting.

Mixing Greens

Because green is a secondary color, many painter choose to mix all of their greens. The possibilities are endless. For simplicity’s sake, the examples below are limited to two yellows (Cadmium Lemon and Indian Yellow) and two blues (Cobalt Teal and Ultramarine Blue).

A six-color, “split primary” palette is one popular approach in choosing and organizing one’s color palette. Essentially, it utilizes a warm and cool for each primary. With the mixing of pigments (subtractive color mixing), there will always be some amount of intensity of color that is lost when two colors are blended together. The mixture is absorbing (subtracting) more of the spectrum of visible light, compared to each of the original colors in the mixture. However, the closer any two colors are on the perimeter of the color wheel, the least amount of intensity will be lost. The Cadmium Lemon and Cobalt Teal are both on the green side of their respective color families. Therefore, the resulting mixture will yield the mixed greens with the highest chroma. Cadmium Lemon and Cobalt Teal are also opaque, so their mixtures reflect more light off the surface and result in greens of lighter value (brightness).

Colors that live farther apart on the perimeter of the color wheel lose more intensity when mixed together.  Indian Yellow and Ultramarine Blue is a good example.  Each have a red bias (green’s complement), so their mixture will result in a green closer to the neutral center of the color wheel. Indian Yellow and Ultramarine Blue are also transparent in nature, trapping more light within the paint layer and creating a deeper value.

Positioned a moderate distance from each other, mixtures of Cadmium Lemon and Ultramarine Blue, as well as Cobalt Teal and Indian Yellow, predictably fill out the middle of the green hue family- neither the brightest nor the dullest of greens.

“The secret of mixing greens is an understanding of color temperature and value. Every tone and hue must relate to adjacent tones and hues. I prefer to have a large number of colors on my palette, representing numerous points on the color wheel. This allows me greater variety of temperature and saturation in my mixed colors (whether they are light values or dark values) and more options for toning a color if I want to shift or neutralize it. This is especially true for greens. Allowing subtle transitions of warm to cool, dark to light within a passage can make a beautiful statement. Setting a complement like a red, orange, purple or pink next to, or within greens can make all the difference. Additionally, the process of glazing to achieve different greens is important to me.  Sometimes I will directly paint a lighter, warmer, relatively opaque green knowing that at a future point I will glaze a darker, cooler, transparent green (or other transparent color) over it. The two work together to make a new color you can’t get any other way.”
–   Douglas Fryer

Douglas FryerMill Near Sheepscombehttp://douglasfryer.blogspot.com/

DIY Embossing Magic with Excel Blades

Check out this video from Excel Blades where Sam Martin shows you how to emboss vinyl with the Excel Burnisher Set. Not only can you emboss vinyl, but you can also use this stylus on materials like leather, clay, foil, fondant, etc.  

Materials

Process

1.       Grab your tape and tape your artwork you’d like to emboss to the Bristol paper.

2.       Grab your K18 and cut the artwork out; make sure to only cut-out what you want to emboss.

3.       Poke out the cut-out parts of your artwork.

4.       Take off the artwork you taped to the Bristol paper.

5.       Grab your vinyl and place it over the cut-out; make sure the back of the vinyl is facing you.

6.       Grab your stylus and start tracing the cut-out; change out the tips as you emboss to enhance the overall look.

7.       You can use the ball tip to trace the artwork.

8.       Use the spoon tip to emboss larger areas.

9.       Use the needle point tip to emboss the outline of the artwork to enhance the edges.

10.   Fin.