InkTober 2019 Official Prompt List

InkTober 2019 Official Prompt List

🕷️ Ready for InkTober? Above is the InkTober 2019 prompt list, in case you wanted to join in the inky fun. 🕸️

InkTober rules:

1) Make a drawing in ink (you can do a pencil under-drawing if you want). 

2) Post it 

3) Hashtag it with #inktober and #inktober2019 

4) Repeat 

Them’s the rules. We urge you to tag us during the month of October so we can help you to show off your inky creations.

Throwback Thursday: S.C. Mero x Raw Materials

S.C. Mero x Raw Materials Art Supplies

This video of our friend S.C. Mero, a DTLA artist who shops at Raw Materials, is also about a year old. Have you seen her remote-controlled traffic cone zipping through the hood? 🚧 Unfortunately the traffic cone wasn’t with her when she was walking from Sonoratown recently, and she, along with her companion, was hit by a drunk driver and rushed to the hospital with a concussion and other injuries. S.C. assured us through her social media platforms that she is okay and full of love. She’s so amazing. We’re so relieved she’s got such a hard head that she survived. Yay, artists!

Throwback Thursday: Miguel Osuna x Raw Materials

Miguel Osuna x Raw Materials Art Supplies

Was it really a year ago that we shared this video of artist Miguel Osuna with the world? So much has changed since then, but we’re so happy that Miguel is still a loyal, longtime customer, and that he’s doing well in his new studio!

R&F Pigment Stick Video Tutorial w/ Charles Forsberg

R&F Pigment Sticks Video Tutorial with Charles Fosberg

Charles Forsberg demonstrates how Pigment Sticks by R&F Handmade Paints are both a drawing and painting medium like no one else. He frequently returns to drawing, forcefully striking marks into the heavily manipulated buttery paint, then tearing it apart, alternating in a push-pull sequence of drawing and smearing, scraping back, revealing previous drawing marks, and piling what he has scraped up into thick sculptural mounds.

Painting becomes an amazing and unceasing gestural exercise over many hours, as Forsberg turns the formless ooze he started with into a powerful structure of shapes and sharply accented marks. www.charlesforsberg.com/

As part of our MOVING SALE, R&F Pigment Sticks are ON SALE at 15% OFF, including all R&F Pigment Stick Sets. The 6-color sets come packaged in a 6½” Ă— 7½” cradled Ampersand Gessobord with six (6) 38ml pigment sticks. The 12-color set coms in a 8″ Ă— 12″ Ampersand Gessobord with twelve (12) 38ml pigment sticks.

Pierre’s ArtVentures: Albert Handell and Oil Pastels by Sennelier

There are so many reasons to like Sennelier Oil Pastels, check out this video where Pierre from Pierre’s ArtVentures hangs out with artist Albert Handell, who chats about how he uses Sennelier Oil Pastels and oil paint in his work.

Created in the 1940s in collaboration with Picasso, Sennelier Oil Pastels are creamy, lipstick-like pastels that are rich in pigment, cover well, and have outstanding opacity and lightfastness. Available in 110 “classic” colors and 10 iridescent colors, they/re acid-free, can be applied to any surface, and may be thinned with turpentine and worked with a brush. Modern Sennelier Oil Pastels’ diameter are 20% larger than the original stick, and are available in a larger size called “Grand”– the equivalent of eight regular size sticks.

DIY Embossing Magic with Excel Blades

Check out this video from Excel Blades where Sam Martin shows you how to emboss vinyl with the Excel Burnisher Set. Not only can you emboss vinyl, but you can also use this stylus on materials like leather, clay, foil, fondant, etc.  

Materials

Process

1.       Grab your tape and tape your artwork you’d like to emboss to the Bristol paper.

2.       Grab your K18 and cut the artwork out; make sure to only cut-out what you want to emboss.

3.       Poke out the cut-out parts of your artwork.

4.       Take off the artwork you taped to the Bristol paper.

5.       Grab your vinyl and place it over the cut-out; make sure the back of the vinyl is facing you.

6.       Grab your stylus and start tracing the cut-out; change out the tips as you emboss to enhance the overall look.

7.       You can use the ball tip to trace the artwork.

8.       Use the spoon tip to emboss larger areas.

9.       Use the needle point tip to emboss the outline of the artwork to enhance the edges.

10.   Fin.

Introducing Lorraine Watry, Watercolor Artist

Lorraine Watry “Spa Day”, Experimenting with Daniel Smith Extra Fine Watercolors Greys

We are delighted to introduce DANIEL SMITH Watercolor Artist, Lorraine Watry! Lorraine will take us step-by-step through her process for making a watercolor painting.

“Spa Day” is from a photo I took of a Red Crested Cardinal after he’d bathed in a fountain. The photo intrigued me because of all the neutral colors around the bright pop of red-orange on the bird’s head. I decided to experiment with this painting and not only did I try the new DANIEL SMITH Greys, but I also tried a different brand of paper and a technique I don’t usually use – blooms. I began the painting by using my photo software to adjust the composition by moving the bird to the right and added some more water dripping in the fountain.

Step 1: Preliminary steps for “Spa Day”.

Step 1: I start all of my paintings by doing a detailed drawing from my photo. I then enlarge the drawing and transfer it to my watercolor paper using my light table. I stretched my watercolor paper onto foam board and while it was drying overnight, I played with the greys and did a small color study to get an idea of my techniques for the background.

Step 2: Masking out the bird and dripping water shapes, then beginning to add watercolor.

Step 2:  Next, I masked out the bird and dripping water with masking tape. I used masking fluid to mask some of the small drops of water on the bird’s feathers and in the background, as well as the highlights on the bird’s eye. I began the fountain by wetting the area and used a variety of the greys from Alvaro’s Fresco Grey and a little Gray Titanium on the left, to Joseph Z’s Cool and Warm Greys as I moved to the right. While these areas were wet, I flicked on water for blooms and charged in Bronzite Genuine and Mummy Bauxite for color variety and texture. As the area started to dry, I flicked on more of the BronziteGenuine, Mummy Bauxite, and Alvaro’s Caliente Grey to make the fountain feel like rough stone.

Step 3: Using Alvaro’s Fresco Grey in the background on the left….

Step 3: I used Alvaro’s Fresco Grey in the background on the left and under the bird on the ledge. I really like this cool/purple grey and I’m already using it on another painting. I glazed some of the Bronzite Genuine over parts of this area to give the gray fountain some patina. BronziteGenuine is naturally shiny so this pigment is fun to see up close because it sparkles. I used Joseph Z’s Warm Grey and a touch of Alvaro’s Caliente Grey to create the dark shadow on the fountain behind the bird. Then I removed the masking on one of the lines of dripping water to see if my values were working. This helps me decide if I need to add more glazes before removing all the masking.

Step 4: Working around all the greys of the background….

Step 4: I continued working around all the greys of the background and used some of Joseph Z’s Warm Grey for the shadow on the back left. I repeated the greys from the walls of the fountain in the water along with some Green Apatite Genuine and Quinacridone Gold. I debated whether to include the green in the water, but I liked the contrast with the red of the birds head. The green also appears along the front edge of the ledge the bird rests on. I finished up the majority of the background and shadows and then removed the masking fluid on the bird and dripping water.

Step 5: Starting the birds head with Quinacridone Sienna….

Step 5: I was excited to start the birds head and I began with Quinacridone Sienna for the lighter, muted orange feathers. After this dried, I added a mix of Pyrrol Scarlet and Carmine for the red feathers. Then to give the bird life, I painted his eye with a mix of Burnt Umber and Sodalite Genuine. I left the highlight at the bottom of the eye and later painted some Quinacridone Sienna on that area. After removing the mask for the brightest highlight, I added a touch of Cerulean Blue, Chromium to reflect the sky in the bird’s eye. The beak was painted with glazes on dry paper using Burnt Umber, Quinacridone Rose, and Cerulean Blue, Chromium.

Step 6: Painting in the birds feathers with mix of Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber.

Step 6: I decided to use Ultramarine Blue and Burnt Umber, a gray mix that I know well for the birds feathers. This mix allows me to vary the gray from cool to warm and keep a unified look to the feathers. I started adding glazes to the bird’s head for shadows and depth and mixed Cerulean Blue, Chromium and Quinacridone Rose for the shadow on the white body feathers. I softened the edges of some of the feathers by applying water while an area was wet or softened the edge after it had dried.

Occasionally I took a break from the feathers and worked on the dripping water in the background. I wet each drip and then painted it using Alvaro’s Caliente and Fresco Greys. I left some of the edges and circles within the drips white to make them sparkle.

Step 7: After adding many layers to the birds feathers….

Step 7: After adding many layers to the bird’s feathers, I removed the masking fluid from the water drops all around the background. I softened their edges using a small flat brush and water. Then I added some color to some in the shadows. For those that were floating on the water, I added a line to the middle and shaded the reflection in the water. 

Step 8: (Detail) At this point, I took some time to look at the almost finished painting….

Step 8: (Detail) At this point, I took some time to look at the almost finished painting. I decided that I wanted to lift some of the color in the water to create some larger white splashes. I used masking tape and a sharp blade to cut out some shapes. I was pleased with how well the Signature Series Greys lifted. After removing the tape, I cleaned up the shapes I created to integrate them into the surrounding water.

“Spa Day”, 20×28 watercolor by Lorraine Watry

In Conclusion: Normally, I would not recommend using so many different grays in the same painting. In this case, the variety of grays seemed to work together for the colors and textures of the fountain. I feel like this experimental painting was a personal success on multiple fronts. The different cold press paper that I tried worked well and gives me an option from my usual CP paper. I enjoyed experimenting with the textures of the fountain and the Primatek Watercolors, and the New Signature Series Greys really added to that effect with their granulation (Alvaro’s Caliente Grey is the only non-granulating gray in the bunch). Finally, it was a pleasure trying out most of the new DANIEL SMITH Greys in “Spa Day”. My favorites are Alvaro’s Caliente and Fresco Greys. Joseph Z’s Warm and Cool Greys are close runners up. These will be added to my arsenal of convenience colors for future paintings.

Lorraine is a watercolor artist painting waterscapes, birds, and reflective objects in a realistic style. Lorraine’s watercolors are characterized by bright colors, dramatic light, and realistic reflections. She likes the challenge of painting water, glass, and metal and recently has become captivated with birds. Lorraine has a Bachelor of Fine Art from the University of Colorado in Boulder and after college designed clip-art for a graphics company for a few years. Lorraine began working with watercolor 25 years ago and taught the medium at Pikes Peak Community College. She currently teaches watercolor and drawing in her studio and at other venues. Lorraine enjoys the challenge of watercolor and starts her paintings with a detailed drawing. She likes to use intense color and many layers to build up the depth in her images. The DANIEL SMITH pigments are her favorite watercolors for their intensity of color, range of pigments, and beautiful granulations. Lorraine prefers to use the white of the paper and does not add opaque whites to her paintings. She is intrigued by reflections and how they interact to create abstract patterns in a realistic scene.

Exhibition Walkthrough Open House: Elliott Hundley @ MOCA Grand Avenue

Michael Majerus, MoM-Block II, 1996, acrylic on canvas, 141 x 315 x ¾ in. (358.14 x 800.1 x 1.91 cm). The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, gift of Thea Westreich and Ethan Wagner. Photo by Brian Forrest.

Beginning in Spring 2019, MOCA will dedicate its downtown locations to multiple exhibitions celebrating the museum’s 40th anniversary and its permanent collection. Each location will feature special exhibitions highlighting different themes and stories found within the institution’s permanent collection of more than 7,000 objects. As part of this celebration, MOCA will debut a new ongoing series of exhibitions titled Open House.

MOCA will begin this new exhibition series with Open House: Elliott HundleyOn April 25, multimedia artist Elliott Hundley will lead a walkthrough of his exhibition. The show is an exploration of the architecture and origins of collage, and how the visual and material logic of this format has informed artists in MOCA’s collection, as well as Hundley’s own practice.

WHEN

Thursday, Apr 25, 2019
7pm 

WHERE

MOCA Grand Avenue
250 South Grand Ave Los Angeles, CA 90012

ADMISSION: FREE

MORE INFO: 213/621-1732 or visitorengagement@moca.org

School Me Saturday: Experience RED

It’s time again for School Me Saturday, our informal art school of sorts, and today we’re learning all about Gamblin Artists’ Oil Color‘s range of red oil colors:

Along with black and white, red made up the palette of pre-historic times. The combination of iron and oxygen is not only responsible for the red that flows through us but also the red in the landscape – the latter of which exists on Gamblin palettes in the form of Burnt Sienna, Venetian Red and Indian Red.

“I chose Cadmium Red Light as our company color, after reading Kandinsky’s Concerning the Spiritual in Art, which declares that yellow advances, blue recedes, green is at rest, and red vibrates in place. I saw Cadmium Red Light as vibrating with tremendous potential, which is what I hope our colors do for artists – to give them the potential to be their best with high energy.” — Robert Gamblin 

From valuable earth colors, to bright and opaque Cadmium Red Light, to the cool transparency of Quinacridone, Gamblin Reds vary greatly in terms of their chroma, temperature, opacity and transparency. Below are all of Gamblin’s reds mapped out in Color Space:

MINERAL REDS
Brown Pink (PR101, PR149), TRANSPARENT
Burnt Sienna (PBr7), SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Cadmium Red Light (PR108), OPAQUE
Cadmium Red Medium (PR108), OPAQUE
Cadmium Red Deep (PR108), OPAQUE
Indian Red (PR101), OPAQUE
Portland Warm Grey (PW6, PR101, PBk11), OPAQUE
Transparent Earth Red (PR101), TRANSPARENT
Venetian Red (PR101), OPAQUE

MODERN REDS
Alizarin Permanent (PR177), TRANSPARENT
Napthol Red (PR112), SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Napthol Scarlet (PR188), SEMI-TRANSPARENT
Perylene Red (PR149), TRANSPARENT
Quinacridone Magenta (PR122), TRANSPARENT
Quinacridone Red (PV19), TRANSPARENT
Radiant Magenta (PV19, PW6), OPAQUE
Radiant Red (PV149, PW6), OPAQUE
 
Michael RichDaybreak (detail), oil on paper, 30″ x 22″.
michael-rich.com

Alizarin Permanent – closer to its namesake 

If we had to consolidate all of the feedback we’ve received over the years regarding Alizarin Permanent, it’s that painters miss the chroma of traditional Alizarin Crimson in tints and mixtures.

Gamblin Alizarin Permanent was a mixture of anthraquinone red (PR177) and a small amount of phthalo emerald (PG36) which was in the mix to deepen the mass tone of the color. It’s such a small amount and this pigment is so sensitive to the pressure of the mill, that we felt that AP was getting too dark, especially compared to traditional Alizarin Crimson. Alizarin Crimson has always been our target for the color of Alizarin Permanent.

So, we moved AP to a single pigment (PR177) formula. Not only does this make it closer to the masstone and transparency of Alizarin Crimson, but it is higher in chroma in tints and mixtures. If you want to match the darker formula, add a very small amount of either Chromatic Black or Phthalo Emerald. 

Introducing Jansen Chow, Watercolor Artist

We are delighted to introduce DANIEL SMITH Watercolor Artist, Jansen Chow! Jansen will take us step-by-step through his process for making a watercolor portrait. All Daniel Smith Watercolors, Sets, and Grounds are on sale for 40% off during the month of March – so now is the perfect time to test out some colors, treat yourself to that set you’ve been eyeing, and/or experiment with new techniques!

To demonstrate the DANIEL SMITH watercolor paints and my appreciation and understanding of their characteristics, I have used my favourite 18 colors from the DANIEL SMITH Watercolour collection [see Jansen’s Dot Card colors and list further below] to complete this painting. The title of this artwork is “Tinkus dancer at the Oruro Carnival”. This painting was completed to participate in an International Exhibition organized by the Bolivia Watercolor Society. I chose a colour theme that can represent the National colors of Bolivia.

Jansen Chow’s DANIEL SMITH Artist Dot Card with Watercolor tubes with “Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Canival” painting

Today, I will share my creative process of how I created this painting in 6 simple steps:

Step 1. Drawing or sketch for Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Carnival

Step 1 : Drawing / Sketching

I have a lot of ways to start my paintings. Sometimes I like to use a pencil to sketch out the details, other times I start with just a general pencil sketch, and occasionally I paint directly with a brush. I wanted this painting to appear more realistic, so I drew the face very carefully with pencil, but only a few strokes for the background as I wanted it to have a more carefree simple background.  

Step 2. Mixing the colors directly on the paper for Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Carnival

Step 2: Mixing the colors directly on the paper

I personally do not like to mix the colors too much on the color palette but prefer to mix the colors directly on the paper.  I first freely applied the DANIEL SMITH paint from my palette directly on the paper to add color to the face of the character and the hat with the colorful feathers, with a combination of thick and thin colour application. 

Step 3. Completing the main subject for Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Carnival

Step 3: Completing the main subject 

My usual technique is to leave the highlights of the main subject white, to capture the reflecting light rays. I then slowly painted the important portions of the main subject and applied more details to about 80% of completion of my artwork.  Often artists will focus on completing the main subject to about 100%, but for me, I usually focus on completing it up to 70-80% of the whole artwork, so that there is room to add in more colors and strokes as the overall work is nearing 100% completion.

Step 4. Application of the background for Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Carnival

Step 4: Application of the background

I used a single color, Payne’s Gray, to color the background in an easy and free way with the brush and water spray technique. The grey background contrasts sharply with the main subjects’ vibrant and fresh colors! During this process, I pay attention to the space treatment and try to complete the background in an interesting manner during the application of colors by keeping some white spaces.

Step 5. Gradients of the background for Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Carnival

Step 5: Gradients of the background

I gradually added my favorite 18 colors both carefully and freely through lighter brush strokes. The usage of brushes at this stage is very important! You must use a softer brushstroke with the right pressure and direction to show greater space contrast between the background and the main subject.

Step 6. “Tinkus Dancer at the Oruro Carnival” by Jansen Chow.

Step 6: The Finish 

In addition to the strong light illuminating the part of the main body through the white space left earlier, I used watercolor brushes of different sizes and design to apply all the colors on my palette with different strokes, from treating the light to dark areas, to applying bright to dark colors for the details and background of the main subject. Upon completion, you will see that this piece has a strong sense of music surrounding the main subject, because of the colors chosen and the brush strokes applied. The overall feeling of this painting is warm and happy! This really achieves the emotion that I want to express through this painting – that the world is beautiful!

I am very honored and happy to be able to share with you the creative process of my work. I hope you liked it. Thank you!

–Jansen Chow
Jansen Chow in front of his watercolor painting of Machu Picchu

I have always liked painting this beautiful and colorful world with rich texture and colors, and DANIEL SMITH paints make it very easy for me to achieve that effect in my artwork. For me, DANIEL SMITH Watercolors are beautifully made, colorful and offer lots of choices. Most importantly, unlike other brands of paint, the richness and vibrancy of the colours assist me in capturing the beauty I see in this world and express that in my paintings. 

My 18 Favourite DANIEL SMITH Watercolors on my Dot Card and used in this step by step article

Lemon Yellow

Indian Yellow

Cadmium Yellow Deep Hue

Permanent Red Deep

Alizarin Crimson

Permanent Orange

Cerulean Blue

Ultramarine Blue

Viridian

Permanent Green

Cobalt Teal Blue

Cobalt Violet Deep

Cobalt Violet

Payne’s Gray

Indian Red

Yellow Ochre

Opera Pink

Indigo

Jansen Chow is a signature member of the American Watercolor Society (AWS) and National Watercolor Society (NWS).  He won an art scholarship and studied in The Art Students League of New York, New York from 1994-1996, and he was a student of Mario Cooper, a great American Watercolor Master.  Jansen has held 18 solo art exhibitions and took part in more than 350 National and International watercolor exhibitions since 1992. He has won more than 60 National and International awards in watercolor, oil, etching and photography since 1988, including receiving 1st place 9 times in watercolor competitions in USA, Canada, Turkey and Malaysia. Recently he was the IWS Malaysia Country Head, FabrianoInAcqurello Malaysia Country Leader, and the curator of “1st Malaysia International Watercolor Biennale 2018”. 

Jansen Chow lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia